Book by Marina Salye, Part 5

Book by Leningrad/St. Petersburg city council member (1990–1993) and anti-corruption investigator, Marina Salye: Mafruption, mafruption!!! Mafia and corruption, Moscow, 1994; edition: “Zakryty Club”.

In this book, Marina Salier analyzes the decrees of President Yeltsin, the orders of the government at that time, and concludes that they are condoning corruption, masquerading as “increased control” and “fighting organized crime which tries to penetrate power”. Thus, the retention of export licenses has led to them becoming “expensive” — that is, they were sold for a bribe. She points out the irony over other decrees, like “the free sale of goods on the basis of a permit issued”; showing the unlimited power of civil servants at that time.

Book by Marina Salye, Part 4

Book by Leningrad/St. Petersburg city council member (1990–1993), Marina Salye, Mafruption, mafruption!!! Mafia and corruption, Moscow, 1994; edition: “Zakryty Club”. Part 4.

In this book, Marina Salye analyzes the decrees of President Yeltsin, the orders of the government at that time, and concludes that they are condoning corruption, masquerading as “increased control” and “fighting organized crime which tries to penetrate power”. Thus, the retention of export licenses led to them becoming “expensive” — that is, they were sold for a bribe. She points out the irony of other decrees, like “the free sale of goods on the basis of a permit issued”, showing the unlimited power of civil servants at that time.

 

Book by Marina Salye, Part 3

Book by Leningrad/St. Petersburg city council member (1990–1993), Marina Salye: Mafruption, mafruption!!! Mafia and corruption, Moscow, 1994; edition: “Zakryty Club”. Part 3.

In this book, Marina Salye analyzes the decrees of President Yeltsin, the orders of the government at that time, and concludes that they are condoning corruption, masquerading as “increased control” and “fighting organized crime which tries to penetrate power”. Thus, the retention of export licenses led to them becoming “expensive” — that is, they were sold for a bribe. She points out the irony of other decrees, like “the free sale of goods on the basis of a permit issued”, showing the unlimited power of civil servants at that time.