Lukoil’s link to mobster Zakhari Kalashov (Shakro)

Switzerland’s Prosecutor’s office rogatory letter to Spanish judge Fernando Andreu, 2005. Zakar Kalashov (nickname Shakro), linked to Solntsevskaya and Izmaylovskaya gangs, is said to be shareholder of a considerable part of Lukoil oil company.  Shakro was detained in Spain and later in Moscow whre his ties to high rank law enforcers were discovered.

kalashov2

Timchenko’s foundation managers

CHE-114.275.673

Gennady Timchenko’s family foundation in Switzerland (“Fondation Neva”). Declared goals are “to undertake any action to assist, promote, provide financial support to persons, activities, projects, events, and programs in the fields of art, culture, architecture, preservation of historic monuments, sport, health, education, the environment…”.

As of 2019, managers are Elena Timchenko (wife), Xeniia Frank (daughter), and Pavel Chinsky. Pavel Chinsky doesn’t specify his affiliation to the Foundation in his public speeches and opinions (“Sanctions will strengthen Putin’s regime“, “France is interested in Russia seriously and on a long term basis”), introducing himself only as managing director of the FrancoRussian Chamber of Commerce & Industry.

Timchenko is a billionaire, long-time shareholder of Bank “Rossiya”, co-founder of judo club,

“Yavara Neva”, and one of the leading winners of government procurement contracts in Russia with “Volga Group”.

He has been Vladimir Putin’s friend since the early 1990s. Putin recognized this only in 2011, claiming that he did not help Timchenko to build his oil empire. In 2003, Timchenko denied any relation to Putin to a Swiss newspaper, which was curious about the fortune of a newcomer in Geneva. He also said he was “almost retired” and not active in business. With $18.9 billion, he became of of the most wealthy businessmen in the whole world by 2019 (Forbes).

In the context of the investigation on the Sotrama oil company in Monaco, certain data from French intelligence on Gennady Timchenko (Timtchenko) was obtained by the Monégasque police for Sotrama’s file. It is not clear what kind of data it was.

FSB and organized crime’s connection, Swiss Intel’s analytical report (Russian translation)

See copy of original document in German here, English Translation here.

 

Служба анализа и профилактики,
Федеральная служба полиции

Стратегический аналитический отчет

Конфиденциально

Организованная
преступность и спецслужбы СНГ

швейцарский_доклад(14)

The connection between the FSB and organized crime: Swiss Intelligence’s analytical report (English translation)

See a copy of the original document in German here.

Service for Analysis and Prevention

The Swiss Federal Office of Police

Strategic Analysis Report

[Confidential]

Organised Crime and the Special Services of the Commonwealth of Independent States

June 2007

Contents

  • Key points
  • Organised Crime and the Special Services of Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS):
  1. The historical relations between security services and criminal structures
  2. Criminal groups today
  3. Special services today: the FSB-isation of the country?
  4. The relations between organised crime groups and the security services
  5. The situation in Switzerland
  6. Counter-measures

Key points

The Federal Law on Internal Security Protection Measures (BWIS) mandates the Service for Analysis and Prevention (DAP) to develop measures to promptly discern and prevent the threats of illicit operations by foreign intelligence agencies (Item 3 of Article 2).

Over the past few years, DAP has been receiving a growing number of indications that members of organised crime groups from CIS countries maintain liaisons with the intelligence services of their countries. German Intelligence even mentions a “symbiosis” between organised crime and secret services.

Since Vladimir Putin’s entry to power, the Russian security services, especially the Federal Security Service (FSB), have been significantly reinforced.

Considering Russia’s economic growth and the expansion of the country’s influence in the sphere of energy, it is necessary to examine the role of security services and organised crime within that sphere. It must also be established whether they still preserve their connections, how those connections are made, and how they function in the Swiss territory….

FSB and OC Swiss intel report

 

Credit Lyonnais, Saint Petersburg, 1992

Credit Lyonnais Chesnokov

Phonebook from Credit Lyonnais Bank, 1992, showing that its headquarters office in Russia had been opened in St. Petersburg (see Putin’s words on this back in 1992). Office chief was Michel Tschesnakoff (also known as Mikhail Chesnakov or Chesnokov). By 2015, Chesnakov, then president of ABB Russia (Switzerland), was investigated in Switzerland because of suspicions that he opened Credit Lyonnais’ accounts to accept illegal kickbacks from Siemens to Gazprom. In a Swiss court, the defendants claimed that the purpose of transactions was payment for consultation and were acquitted.

The connection between the FSB and organized crime: Swiss Intelligence’s analytical report

FSB und OK Schweizer Bericht re

Swiss Intelligence report on cooperation between organized crime and the FSB, June 2007. Swiss authors say that German intelligence verifies the existence of “symbiosis” between Russian organized crime and intelligence, but the Swiss can see only cooperation between them on a case-to-case basis. German language.

Names mentioned: Mogilevich, Luchansky, Birshtein, Kantor.

Entities: Seabeco group.

See English translation here.

See Russian translation here.

Source: Jürgen Roth’s archive. Low-quality copy.

See also Chapter 4 of the report titled “Beziehungen zwischen OK und ND” — “Relationship between criminality and the intelligence services” in readable German.