Accusation act of Troika (Tambovskaya gang) case and Gennady Petrov in Spain, June 2015

Dated of May 29, 2015. See also Russian translation.

petrov accusation act
In 2007, Spanish Special Anticorruption Prosecutor’s office started to investigate the activity of Russian members of Tambov-Malyshev (Tambovsko-Malyshevskaya, Tambovskaya) gang settled in Spain since 1998. Three main suspects, Gennady Petrov, Alexander Malyshev and Sergey Kuzmin, were targeted. Sergey Kuzmin escaped the arrest in Spain, while Petrov and Malyshev initially served in prison for about 1,5 years and were allowed to go back to Spain – under the condition to show up in court. As such, the “Troika” (three people literally – Malyshev, Petrov and Kuzmin) is described in the  accusation of 1994 in Sant-Petersburg against the Tambov-Malyshev gang of creating organized crime community , extortion, gathering slush funds and their laundering in Europe. Foot soldiers of the gang were detained with guns and cash, including a policeman Ob’edkov who is said to use work’s gun during raid attacks.

The present Spanish accusation act, submitted by prosecutors to court in 2015, attributes financial operations for total of about 50 million euros, between Liberia, Panama, Lichtenstein, Cyprus, Switzerland, Spain, Russia and others, to money laundering operations carried out in 1998-2007 by subordinates of Petrov, under pretexts of fictitious loans, consulting services and others.

Petrov failed to show up at court (as well as Malyshev or Kuzmin). The accusation was maintained against 18 defendants and then withdrawn against Vadim Romanyuk and maintained against 17 defendants by the prosecutors.

While the sentence, issued in 2018, recognized the suspicious transactions as “anti economic”, the difficulty was to prove the predicate offence when Russian authorities gave contradictory reports to Spain on the Tambov / gang, amid suspicion of strong ties of the main defendants with the Russian law enforcers and government. In 2009, Russian Prosecutor’s office sent a response to Spain on Tambov gang. But the defendant State Duma member Vladislav Reznik submitted FSB reports on Petrov . The FSB reports state that Petrov is not known to be subjected to any investigation in Russia or to be head of  a gang (p. 66, p 67 of the sentence).

In 2018, the Spanish court Audiencia nacional trusted Sankt-Petersburg’s court aquittal of 1995 and the more recent FSB reports, including of its Sankt-Petersburg branch, presented by the defence.  The Spanish court goes to assert that “Malyshevskaya gang” exists but Malyshev does not belong to it. In 1995, a victim of Malyshev Mr. Belikov said in court in Sankt-Petersburg that he mixed up Malyshev and Petrov with somebody else, points out Audiencia Nacional in 2018 aquittal. Petrov was acquitted in Sankt-Petersburg (Petrov’s former partner said, Petrov asked for everybody to contribute for a bribe back then). Malyshev was convicted for criminal possession of a weapon.

The “anti-economic” transactions from Cyprus, Panama, Liberia, and Liechtenstein to Spain by collaborators of Gennadios (Gennady) Petrov, Sergey Kuzmin, and Alexander Malishev do not indicate that the money was criminal, the sentence states. Spanish judges even acquitted two defendants who acknowledged themselves to be guilty of money laundering and of organized crime, Mikhail Rebo  [based in Germany] and Leon (Leonid) Khazine.

The Spanish sentence pretends that Petrov was not involved in organized crime, based on two reports from the Russian FSB and several more letters from different Russian law enforcement bodies, as well as on the conviction for defamation of a Russian media outlet for linking Gennady Petrov and Ilya Traber to organized crime (for background, see freedom of press in Russia . See on TBCA: evidence from monegasque police of Traber’s membership in Tambovskaya gang over Monaco and Liechtenstein’s oil trading operations. Traber failed to show up in court.

See also for background: Intercepted calls expose ties between the Tambovskaya gang, head of FSB’s Economic Security Service, and the Prosecutor of St. Petersburg.

In the sentence, the defendant, Vladislav Reznik, is recognized as a former member of the managing board of Bank Rossiya. Gennady Petrov (the main defendant who escaped from Spain to Russia) is described as co-founder and 27% shareholder of Bank Rossiya until 2003, which ought to prove the legality of his activities and his high standard of living.

The Russian-Swedish company, Petrodin (one of St. Petersburg’s municipal casino operators in the 1990s, no inactive), is also mentioned by Spanish judges as a legal entity of Petrov, explaining his wealth.

In the office of PETRODIN Joint-Venture a box with cash in plastic bag is found (1993), see search protocol of Petrodin, 1993. See also Petrodin’s casino stand , established officially for “market research”. From TBCA on Petrodin: see Petrov’s Swedish partner’s letter, 1994.

Yuri Salikov was acquitted in the Troika case in 2018, on charges of money laundering of the Tambov gang funds, like all the other defendants. Several months later, Salikov was convicted by Audiencia Nacional for tax evasion for the same transactions. The Salikov and Petrov’s Spanish company Sunstar SL invested funds of unknown origin to real estate, fabricating evidence of a loan, the sentence says.

 

Swiss prosecutor Bertossa on Pavel Borodin’s sentence in money laundering’s “Kremlingate”

From the book by Bernard Bertossa and Agathe Duparc. Paris, Fayard, 2009

Bertossa on Borodin Mabetex

The case of embezzlement and laundering of up to 15 million $ on the Kremlin’s buildings restauration, also known as Kremlingate, during president Eltsin’s administration.

Russian authorities dropped the file, transmitted by Switzerland, saying that they received “only copies of the documents which are not proofs”. In Switzerland Russian official (the Head of the Presidential Property Management Department) Pavel Borodin was found guilty and sentenced to a fine in 2002.

Geneva’s Prosecutor Bernard Bertossa:

In this case, we had all the evidence against Pavel Borodin: receipts, contracts, bank accounts. After that, those who wanted to cover up the scandal took over the case in Russia, we received a visit to Geneva from the Russian prosecutor and judge responsible for the investigation. We showed our file to them. I remember the prosecutor, a huge guy in the old apparatchik style, who never smiled. Both didn’t want to hear or understand anything, it was a dialogue of the deaf. They were in absolute bad faith. I imagine they came to Switzerland to find out what we knew, and maybe better prepare for the absolution of Borodin. In any case, we quickly understood that their attitude was exclusively dictated by political motives unrelated to the implementation of the law. Shortly after this interview, we learned that the file open in Moscow was closed. One of the reasons given was that the documents we had forwarded were not originals and therefore could not be considered as evidence. It was filthy hypocrisy!
But, after all, we didn’t need the Russians to go through the proceedings. In 2000, Geneva’s judge Daniel Devaud decided to indict Pavel Borodin and issued an international arrest warrant against him. <>
In 2002 Borodine and two Swiss financial intermediaries, who had helped him to wire transfer the amounts obtained due to  his corruption, were however found guilty of money laundering and sentenced to fines of 400,000 francs.  They did not appeal. As in many other cases, this case had some side effects. Our file was sent to the Swiss tax authorities and one of the companies that participates in the corruption of Borodin was ordered to reimburse ca. 10 million francs to settle taxes fraud…”

Lukoil’s link to mobster Zakhari Kalashov (Shakro)

Switzerland’s Prosecutor’s office rogatory letter to Spanish judge Fernando Andreu, 2005. Zakar Kalashov (nickname Shakro), linked to Solntsevskaya and Izmaylovskaya gangs, is said to be shareholder of a considerable part of Lukoil oil company.  Shakro was detained in Spain and later in Moscow whre his ties to high rank law enforcers were discovered.

kalashov2

Timchenko’s foundation managers

CHE-114.275.673

Gennady Timchenko’s family foundation in Switzerland (“Fondation Neva”). Declared goals are “to undertake any action to assist, promote, provide financial support to persons, activities, projects, events, and programs in the fields of art, culture, architecture, preservation of historic monuments, sport, health, education, the environment…”.

As of 2019, managers are Elena Timchenko (wife), Xeniia Frank (daughter), and Pavel Chinsky. Pavel Chinsky doesn’t specify his affiliation to the Foundation in his public speeches and opinions (“Sanctions will strengthen Putin’s regime“, “France is interested in Russia seriously and on a long term basis”), introducing himself only as managing director of the FrancoRussian Chamber of Commerce & Industry.

Timchenko is a billionaire, long-time shareholder of Bank “Rossiya”, co-founder of judo club,

“Yavara Neva”, and one of the leading winners of government procurement contracts in Russia with “Volga Group”.

He has been Vladimir Putin’s friend since the early 1990s. Putin recognized this only in 2011, claiming that he did not help Timchenko to build his oil empire. In 2003, Timchenko denied any relation to Putin to a Swiss newspaper, which was curious about the fortune of a newcomer in Geneva. He also said he was “almost retired” and not active in business. With $18.9 billion, he became of of the most wealthy businessmen in the whole world by 2019 (Forbes).

In the context of the investigation on the Sotrama oil company in Monaco, certain data from French intelligence on Gennady Timchenko (Timtchenko) was obtained by the Monégasque police for Sotrama’s file. It is not clear what kind of data it was.

FSB and organized crime’s connection, Swiss Intel’s analytical report (Russian translation)

See copy of original document in German here, English Translation here.

 

Служба анализа и профилактики,
Федеральная служба полиции

Стратегический аналитический отчет

Конфиденциально

Организованная
преступность и спецслужбы СНГ

швейцарский_доклад(14)

The connection between the FSB and organized crime: Swiss Intelligence’s analytical report (English translation)

See a copy of the original document in German here.

Service for Analysis and Prevention

The Swiss Federal Office of Police

Strategic Analysis Report

[Confidential]

Organised Crime and the Special Services of the Commonwealth of Independent States

June 2007

Contents

  • Key points
  • Organised Crime and the Special Services of Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS):
  1. The historical relations between security services and criminal structures
  2. Criminal groups today
  3. Special services today: the FSB-isation of the country?
  4. The relations between organised crime groups and the security services
  5. The situation in Switzerland
  6. Counter-measures

Key points

The Federal Law on Internal Security Protection Measures (BWIS) mandates the Service for Analysis and Prevention (DAP) to develop measures to promptly discern and prevent the threats of illicit operations by foreign intelligence agencies (Item 3 of Article 2).

Over the past few years, DAP has been receiving a growing number of indications that members of organised crime groups from CIS countries maintain liaisons with the intelligence services of their countries. German Intelligence even mentions a “symbiosis” between organised crime and secret services.

Since Vladimir Putin’s entry to power, the Russian security services, especially the Federal Security Service (FSB), have been significantly reinforced.

Considering Russia’s economic growth and the expansion of the country’s influence in the sphere of energy, it is necessary to examine the role of security services and organised crime within that sphere. It must also be established whether they still preserve their connections, how those connections are made, and how they function in the Swiss territory….

FSB and OC Swiss intel report

 

Credit Lyonnais, Saint Petersburg, 1992

Credit Lyonnais Chesnokov

Phonebook from Credit Lyonnais Bank, 1992, showing that its headquarters office in Russia had been opened in St. Petersburg (see Putin’s words on this back in 1992). Office chief was Michel Tschesnakoff (also known as Mikhail Chesnakov or Chesnokov). By 2015, Chesnakov, then president of ABB Russia (Switzerland), was investigated in Switzerland because of suspicions that he opened Credit Lyonnais’ accounts to accept illegal kickbacks from Siemens to Gazprom. In a Swiss court, the defendants claimed that the purpose of transactions was payment for consultation and were acquitted.

The connection between the FSB and organized crime: Swiss Intelligence’s analytical report

FSB und OK Schweizer Bericht re

Swiss Intelligence report on cooperation between organized crime and the FSB, June 2007. Swiss authors say that German intelligence verifies the existence of “symbiosis” between Russian organized crime and intelligence, but the Swiss can see only cooperation between them on a case-to-case basis. German language.

Names mentioned: Mogilevich, Luchansky, Birshtein, Kantor.

Entities: Seabeco group.

See English translation here.

See Russian translation here.

Source: Jürgen Roth’s archive. Low-quality copy.

See also Chapter 4 of the report titled “Beziehungen zwischen OK und ND” — “Relationship between criminality and the intelligence services” in readable German.